GP+ Networking is attracting medical students to become GP’s

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One of the main drivers that led to me setting up GP+ Networking was to demonstrate to colleagues what is possible within primary care. Many medical students make future career choices based on perceptions made within clinical teaching sessions. It has been recently highlighted by the Chair of RCGP that the perception of General practice in medical schools is often a negative one. I was certainly experience the “whether you like it or not 50% of you will end up as GPs”.

Exposure to general practice may be limited and focuses on core general practice only. General practice offers a hugely diverse career within core general practice but even more so beyond it with the increasingly popular extended roles.

I myself have taken my surgical skills and used them to provide skin surgery within my own practice. I am still in the process of developing this further. My career is constantly developing whilst I have a fantastic foundation within my partnership.

GP+ Networking caught the attention of Henry, a Bristol university medical student who had assumed his career would lead him into surgery. Through discovery of the range of surgical activity possible within primary care he now feels that general practice will give him the perfect balance for his career. Not only that, he is now actively encouraging his peers to register on the website to browse the possibilities themselves.

Turning heads towards a career in general practice

Our future career choices are often led by those who inspire us. Henry has found that GP+ Networking has done that for general practice.

Currently general practice does not get the same exposure within undergraduate training, let alone general practice with special interests and extended roles. If students are blind to those possibilities they will not follow us.

GP+ Networking allows students to search out GP trainees and GPs who can inspire them and connect with them on a one to one basis. Adding a personal dimension to career advice is a powerful tool and one that we should embrace.

I was an ST3 in plastic surgery when I decided to change to a career in GP. I know that there will be others within specialist training schemes whose life priorities or interests have changed and would consider an alternative career. The difference is now GP+ Networking allows them to look around and connect to GPs with a similar background and make an informed choice. This is happening even with GP+ Networking being in its infancy

“I’m an ST3 in Paeds but considering changing to GP. Thought I’d use your site to give me an idea of the additional roles some GPs take on”

I think the network is a powerful tool to solve our workforce crisis. When primary care is strong then the NHS is strong.

Why get involved as a GP?

Henry has also allowed me to reflect on my own achievements and recognised how interesting and variable my own job is currently. Being reminded of this when we are all working hard is important for morale. Teaching, mentoring and coaching are so important to energise our practice.

It can be an isolating profession sometimes. In our social lives many of us are more connective than ever via social media. GP+ Networking allows us to form communities based on our professional interests within a secure environment.

The larger the GP+Networking community is the greater it will be as a resource for general practice.

Be a part of it and watch it grow. Register now and create your profile for free.

If you would like to showcase your work as a GP with an extended role then please get in contact. We would love to here from you.

An Introduction to GP+ Networking- A space for innovation

GP+ Networking stands for a better way of GPs working together and provides a refreshing space for innovation away from the bombardment of emails.

As the membership of GP+ Networking gathers momentum we are continuously developing the site based on the feedback of our early adopters.

The introduction to GP+ Networking video was viewed on Facebook 1300 times in 48hours! Hits to the homepage were over 1000 last month. This is a great encouragement but we know that we have to hit a critical membership mass.

Strong membership will allow the 14955763_1354874164553048_4520353774883868848_n-2project to reach its potential as being the ‘go to site’ for all your professional development needs.

Remember that ‘extended roles’ are clinical and non clinical. A new extended role is ‘quality improvement’. If you haven’t selected it on registration and would like to please edit your profile.

Cathryn has big plans to build further helpful  functionality based on the bedrock of the networking site but first things are first.

The site is currently being used to find people of similar interests, run group chats based on those interests, find events and connect with those also attending.

 

 

Current feedback

“I’m an ST3 in Paeds but considering changing to GP. Thought I’d use your site to give me an idea of the additional roles some GPs take on”

“I was really glad to discover another GP on this site with a special interest in an area of clinical work that has always appealed to me. Finding colleagues that share a similar enthusiasm has given me options to develop my career in that direction.”

“All my relevant documents are sat on my profile”

Early adopters

We have a membership of 130 following our soft launch in August and 1300 likes on Facebook. We want to gather as much feedback as possible from our membership and ensure that Cathryn’s plans are prioritised to the needs of the membership.

Cathryn will be creating a group chat through the site for the most enthusiastic early adopters to shape GP+ Networking.

If you would like to be a part of that group and learn more then please contact her via  her profile ‘connect’ button. 

Register now

I have a huge passion for a health care system that is “For Humans, By Humans”

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I believe that to optimise our health and wellbeing we need to view healthcare through a broader lense. Having undertaken postgraduate studies in Sports & Exercise Medicine (and attended courses on expedition medicine) I have come to understand that the biomedical model whilst very useful does not address all our health needs in the most efficient or effective way. With this in mind I have developed a model called “The Human Five” (…it’s not revolutionary, and actually pretty simple! – see ‘my files’ for a simple PDF of the concept)…..it aims to be a universal health and wellbeing model, and very versatile – for example a consultation tool, a framework for managing long term health, or a tool to help optimise provider or individual performance, and inter-organisation collaboration. If you have any ideas or thoughts on any of this, or have similar interests, then I would love to hear from you.

I am married and have a young family. I live between Bath, Bristol and Wells. My non-work interests are running, sailing and general adventure/exploring.

1998-2003 Medical School in Leeds

2003-2007 PRHO and the GP VTS years in Yorkshire

2008-2009 GP in Yorkshire. Also post grad studies in Teaching and Organisational Behaviour and Managing Change.

2009-present GP partner in Wells Health Centre, Somerset

2010-2015 Post grad studies in Sports & Exercise Medicine at Bath Uni

Campbell Murdoch

GP Career Event

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Dr Cathryn Dillon , the founder of GP+ Networking was happy to attend the RCGP Severn faculty GP career discussion in Bristol on Tuesday. What was clear from the event was the wide range of training opportunity available in GP training. Recent changes included a deferred entry scheme to allow FY2 doctors the chance to explore outside interests before starting GP training and the ‘Step on Step off’ model that allows time to expand training in specialist interest areas. The event spoke about academic fellow posts and the global health programme, which is so attractive for many considering career options. The ease of less than full time training was highlighted to allow a better work life balance or indeed to continue additional studies in extended roles.

Cathryn presented her findings from a study of 440 GPST trainees in the South West. It was a surprise to learn that 95% of trainees wanted some form of extended role within general practice. Popular choices were emergency medicine, surgery and education. Closer working between primary and secondary care delivering care closer to home seems to be the future. GP+ Networking has been built in view of this progression within general practice and will provide the communication platform to match those with similar extended roles. Register your interest at www.medicalnetworking.co.uk by signing in. Once fully launched it will be free to use .

I never had any doubt that I wanted a GP career

GP+ Networking Martin RolandI never had any doubt that I wanted a GP career. It always seemed to me the most varied, interesting and challenging branch of medicine and I’ve always liked never knowing what would come in the door next. I think the ‘routine’ bits of general practice must be more varied than almost any other job on earth. I also really like the freedom of being in a practice where we were our own bosses and could organise our own time within our GP career.

When I finished my vocational training, I thought I’d try academic general practice for a few years and found I really enjoyed the research though it took a while to discover whether I’d be any good at it.

Anyhow, 35 years and 250 research publications later, it seems to have worked out OK. I was Professor of General Practice in Manchester for 18 years and I’m now Professor of Health Services Research at Cambridge.

Much of my research has been about measuring and improving quality of care, and one of the continuing challenges has been how to influence primary care policy in the NHS. I have quite a lot of meetings in Whitehall and it’s surprising how often I’m round a table when I’m the only person who’s ever seen a patient. Not what I thought I’d be doing when I started out as a GP.

Professor Martin Roland CBE